Andrew R. Dolloff, Superintendent of Schools
Laurie Brigham, Administrative Assistant to the Superintendent
Andrew Dolloff is in his first year as Superintendent of Schools in Yarmouth, after completing five years in the same position in Maine RSU 21. Andrew is a 27-year veteran of Maine public schools, having begun his career as a chemistry teacher and basketball coach in central Maine before moving into school administration in Greater Portland in 1996. Over the past 19 years he has served as a superintendent, assistant superintendent, high school principal, assistant principal, and athletic administrator.

In 2004, Andrew was named Maine’s Outstanding High School Principal, and in 2005 he was named to the International Advisory Board for the Harvard Graduate School of Education’s Principals’ Center. In recent years, Andrew has served on the Executive Committee of the Maine School Superintendents' Association, and on the Campaign Cabinet of the United Way of Greater Portland. Currently, Andrew is on the advisory board for the University of Southern Maine’s Educational Leadership program and is a member of the District Administration Leadership Institute.

Andrew completed his bachelor's degree at the University of Maine at Farmington, his Master's degree at the University of Southern Maine, and advanced studies at both the University of Southern Maine and the University of New England. He is a PhD candidate at the Edmund S. Muskie School of Public Service, where his dissertation is focused on resource allocation in Maine’s more efficient public high schools, one of which is Yarmouth High School.

101 McCartney Street, Yarmouth, ME 04096       
207-846-5586
Fax: 207-846-2339      
Open 7:30 AM - 4:00 PM, Monday - Friday


Strategic Planning Underway:
Yarmouth Schools are now in the process of developing a five year Strategic Plan. 
ten-member Planning Team has been formed to create a five-year strategic plan for the school department to include, at a minimum, statements of mission and core beliefs, with identified goals and actions for meeting those goals. The team will be comprised of: 

Two members of the School Committee: Leah Guay and Tim Wheaton
One member of the Town Council: Randall Bates
Two school administrators: Josh Ottow, High School Assistant Principal, and Joan Adler, Middle School Assistant Principal
Two teachers: Kim Grover, Harrison Middle School, and Laura Elder, Rowe School
Two community members: Michael Wilbur and Anne Ball
Superintendent of Schools: Andrew Dolloff

The Planning Team will engage the community and staff in the planning process, will report on its progress at a School Committee meeting each month, and will present a draft plan for the School Committee’s review, input, and eventual approval by the final School Committee meeting of the 2014-2015 school year. The School Committee reserves the authority to edit, approve, and distribute the Strategic Plan.
We will keep you apprised of our progress on this page.




                                                                                             







District Report Card:
The Federal No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) requires that all public school students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 participate in standardized testing each year. For approximately two decades testing for Maine students consisted of the Maine Educational Assessment (MEA). Approximately eight years ago, the test for students in grade 11 was changed to the SAT for mathematics and reading, with a supplementary science test added to the assessment to provide data on student understanding in that subject matter. The state now refers to the SAT and science supplement as the Maine High School Assessment (MHSA). In 2009, the assessment for students in grades 3-8 changed to the New England Common Assessment Program (NECAP), allowing for performance comparisons between students in Maine and those in Rhode Island, New Hampshire, and Vermont. In the coming year, all grade levels will be assessed using the Smarter Balanced Assessment, with both the MHSA and the NECAP falling by the wayside.

Regardless of the “test du jour” of this ever-evolving assessment landscape, Yarmouth schools and students have performed significantly better than the state average and have often produced the highest scores of any non-magnet, public school district in the state. This is no small accomplishment, as Maine students as a whole out-perform those in most other states. In 2013, Maine 4th graders and 8th graders scored among the top 15 states in math and among the top 20 in reading on the National Assessment of Education Progress (NAEP). Maine is also one of the states identified as scoring higher than the average of 47 countries or subnational education systems that participated in the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS). This is encouraging news, yet Maine schools – and Yarmouth schools in particular – are constantly seeking ways to improve, using data from a wide variety of sources to guide our decision-making processes. In this report we present two sources of data – state and federal accountability programs – that are used to measure our schools’ effectiveness.

Maine School Report Cards
In 2013, Maine started the practice of assigning letter grades to each school participating in the federal assessment program. In this system, schools receive scores based on several factors, including the number of students reaching proficiency, the collective growth of individual students, the growth among students who scored in the bottom 25% in the previous year, or – for high schools – the graduation rate. In Table 1, below, you will find a summary of the Maine School Report Card grades for each of our schools participating in the federal assessment program.

Please be reminded that Rowe School did not receive a grade because there is no grade level in the school participating in the federal assessment program. We know from other indicators – such as the performance of students who move from Rowe School to Yarmouth Elementary School that our primary school also performs at a high level.

Table 1:  Yarmouth Schools 2013-2014 Maine School Report Card Summary

School

Subject Matter

Proficiency Score

Growth

Score

Bottom 25% Growth Score

Graduation Rate

Total Score

Letter Grade

Maine Mean Grade

Yarmouth Elementary School

Reading

83.6

80.7

62.2

NA

319.2

A

C

Mathematics

87.1

82.4

71.7

NA

Harrison Middle School

Reading

88.4

85.6

69.3

NA

324.0

A

C

Mathematics

85.7

80.1

64.9

NA

Yarmouth High School

Reading

85

84.3

NA

4 YR – 96.8

437.8

A

C

Mathematics

85.8

86.2

NA

5 YR – 96.0


You will note that the category scores do not add up to the total score. This is because the state uses a formula that requires the growth scores for grades 3-8 and the graduation rates for high schools to be reduced by ½ before being added into the sum. For Yarmouth Elementary School and Harrison Middle School, a total score of 300 or above is required for an “A”, while at Yarmouth High School, the minimum required for an “A” is 350 points.

Although it may seem incongruous that Maine began assigning letter grades in the same year that legislation was adopted requiring all schools in the state to move away from letter grades and toward a standards-based assessment system, the practice has been implemented and earns a great deal of publicity each year. The data provided is helpful, though we do not consider any single measure to be the sole indicator of how well our schools are doing. This grade does not begin to tell the story of the many high quality programs we offer in foreign language, science, physical education and athletics, visual and performing arts, social studies, robotics, and a plethora of other, equally impressive offerings.

For more information on Maine’s School Report Card program, follow this link: http://www.maine.gov/doe/schoolreportcards/index.html

Despite these reasons for optimism, we are not resting on the laurels of the performance of former students. The professional educators in Yarmouth continue to seek ways to improve the experience for each student as we strive to attain our mission of “empowering all students to create fulfilling lives in a changing world”.

Federal Accountability – NCLB
On a less encouraging note, despite the impressive performance of our students – and recognition from the Maine Department of Education as “A” schools – our schools have now joined the vast majority of districts around the nation that are struggling to meet the constantly rising standards of the NCLB legislation. Most notably, in 2014 our schools joined the long list of those that could not make “Adequate Yearly Progress” (AYP) as the targets set for our schools (which are based on past performance) finally rose above the level we could meet in each subgroup. For example, at Yarmouth High School, it was expected that 80% of our students would be proficient in reading. In fact, 85% of our students met that standard, including 81% of our female students and 90% of our male students. However, because our female students had performed so well for several years prior to 2013, the target for their subgroup was elevated to 92%. The result is that, even though the entire school exceeded the whole school target, because this one subgroup did not meet the subgroup target, the school is deemed as one that is “not making AYP”.

The subgroups that must each meet the AYP targets include groups based on gender, ethnicity, economic standing, disabilities, and English proficiency. As you can well imagine, meeting the challenge to have each of these subgroups meet ever-increasing performance targets in every academic subject requires significant effort – an effort our entire staff is putting in each day as they attempt to ensure that each child receives the attention and instruction he or she deserves as a member of our learning community.

In Table 2, below, you will find a summary of each of our schools participating in the federal assessment program (again, Rowe School does not appear on the list, as students in Kindergarten and Grade 1 are not included in the testing).

Table 2:  Yarmouth Schools 2013-2014 NCLB Report Card Summary

School

Subject Matter

Target (% of students Proficient or Above)

School Score

Maine Mean Score

AYP Status

Yarmouth Elementary School

Reading

90

87

69

Not Making AYP

Mathematics

89

86

64

Not Making AYP

Harrison Middle School

Reading

91

89

73

Not Making AYP

Mathematics

86

88

61

Not Making AYP

Yarmouth High School

Reading

82

85

48

Not Making AYP (Due to subgroup scores)

Mathematics

84

86

48

Not Making AYP (Due to subgroup scores)

Schools that perform well on standardized tests typically have three significant populations: skilled and knowledgeable educators, motivated and aspiring students, and well-educated and supportive parents and community members. We are fortunate to have a large number of each within our district, and we thank you for your continued role in our students’ successes. 


To view NCLB report cards for our schools, please click on the following links:

District:
https://neo.maine.gov/DOE/neo/NCLBReports/Documents/1190/DisNCLB1190.pdf

Yarmouth Elementary School:
https://neo.maine.gov/DOE/neo/NCLBReports/Documents/1190/11901455/SchNCLB11901455.pdf

Harrison Middle School:
https://neo.maine.gov/DOE/neo/NCLBReports/Documents/1190/11901456/SchNCLB11901456.pdf

Yarmouth High School:
https://neo.maine.gov/DOE/neo/NCLBReports/Documents/1190/11901454/SchNCLB11901454.pdf